Nursery Water Vs. Tap Water: The Differences You Didn’t Know

nursery vs tap water

Nursery water, tap water, bottled water; which of these is better, especially when the health and safety of your child involved. This is a problem that many parents are beginning to come to terms with.

Providing your child with drinking water and coming up with a completely reliable and safe way to cook their food, requires more attention than you think. Choosing between Nursery and tap water is a debate that haunts many parents across the country. Different sources provide different outlooks to the question and supply you with different answers. You need to learn more about both types of water in order to choose between the two for yourself.

Nursery water is purified water that has some fluorides added in it, in order to provide nourishment to toddlers and infants. It is processed by the method of steam distillation, which the manufacturers claim makes it a great choice to provide the child with a superior ingredient of health and nourishment. They also say that the water goes through a rigorous process of distillation, which ensures that it is completely safe, and aids in the development of your infant or toddler. Some brands even add some important minerals like magnesium, calcium, or potassium in order to provide greater benefits.

The addition of these ingredients also improves the overall taste of the water, and makes it a very refreshing and enjoyable drink. All the brands undergo continuous and regular monitoring to ensure that the standards are always top quality. But before you go ahead with the purchase, keep this important warning in mind. Nursery water with fluoride has a high chance of harming your child’s teeth. So make it a point to purchase the one without fluoride. Many manufacturers will have you believe that it will not damage your child’s teeth, but do not fall for that. Just play on the safer side instead, and opt for the water without fluoride.

Tap water, on the other hand, is simply the water obtained from the tap. For many years, people all across America have been consuming tap water for various purposes. But off late, this habit is gradually changing amongst the masses, and more and more people are beginning to opt for bottled water. The reason for this is that bottled water is processed and packaged with the sole purpose of being consumed by human beings. The same cannot be said for tap water, as the quality for different regions will be very different. Nonetheless, it is not entirely unsafe. The quality is regulated by the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act, and if there is something wrong with the quality of the water, there will be an uproar in the media. However, it is advisable not to consume tap water.

Tap or Nursery Water

Now if you compare their pros and cons, the question that is naturally bound to arise is which one of them is better. The answer to this question depends heavily on who the consumer is. There are many ways of looking at the dilemma, but ultimately you have to think of the person who will be drinking the water in order to take a call.

If the ultimate consumer is going to be your child or infant, then you obviously wish the best for him/her. Their immune systems are not as strong as that of grown adults, and as a result more care needs to be taken in order to feed them. In most cases, nursery water companies will make tall claims about the benefits of their brands, but to know what ingredients have been used, is a fairly impossible task. There is also a lot of ambiguity in the market about the benefits of fluoride in the water.

On the other hand, tap water is also not without its own risks. There is a chance that the water is not entirely safe, albeit a very small chance. The very best option for you to employ under such a scenario, is to use the water that you have used to cook your food. Instead of draining away the water store it, and come up with different methods to feed it to your child. This is the safest and the healthiest option that you can give your children.


 

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